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Naan Recipe September 26, 2010

Filed under: Other Food — pimom @ 18:28
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When FH and I were in London we had some wonderful Indian cuisine for dinner.  Of course, we had a side of naan with our meal.  FH thought that it was hard to make and I told him I had a great recipe.  It doesn’t taste quite as good as what you would have made in a proper tandoor oven, but it gets pretty close.

Ingredients

1 package active dry yeast

1 cup warm water

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3 tablespoons milk

1 egg, beaten

41/2 cups flour

Put yeast into a small bowl.  Add the warm water and mix with a fork.  Let stand for about ten minutes, until the yeast starts to froth.

Put the yeast mixture into a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook.  Add the sugar, milk, and egg.  Mix together briefly.  Slowly add the flour.

Mix the dough until it no longer sticks to the side of the mixer’s bowl.

Place the dough in an oiled bowl and cover with a damp cloth.  Let it rise in a warm area until the dough has doubled.  It should take about an hour.

Naan dough

Risen Naan dough

Punch down the dough.  Tear of billiard ball size portion of dough.  Place dough on an oiled cookie sheet and cover with a damp cloth. Let rise until doubled, about 1/2 hour.

Once the dough has risen, heat a cast iron skillet on the stove.

Pull the dough into an oblong shape, kind of like how you form/stretch pizza dough.

Place the dough on the hot skillet.  Cook a few minutes on each side, until nicely browned.

The naan tastes best when eaten right away.  It can be refrigerated or frozen.  If you need to reheat it, it is best to reheat it a hot cast iron pan, or under the broiler.  Reheating it in the microwave will make it soft instead of crispy.

Naan

Naan

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Rustic Nut Bars Review September 13, 2010

Filed under: Cookies — pimom @ 18:15
I am sharing this recipe as I have been asked for it many times.  It is, however, not my own recipe, so I copied it from the original source, Taste of Home magazine. They have lost of tasty recipes in their magazines that are made by and shared by home cooks.  I have made this often to rave reviews.  The only things I do differently is I just use milk instead of cream.  I also use random nuts, whatever I have on hand. Usually cashews, almonds, and macadamia nuts.
  • 40 ServingsRustic Nut Bars Recipe
  • Prep: 20 min. Bake: 35 min. + cooling

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon plus 3/4 cup cold butter, divided
  • 2-1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • TOPPING:
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 6 tablespoons butter, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream
  • 1 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted
  • 1 cup roasted salted almonds
  • 1 cup salted cashews, toasted
  • 1 cup pistachios, toasted

Directions

  • Line a 13-in. x 9-in. baking pan with foil; grease the foil with 1 tablespoon butter. Set aside.
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt; cut in remaining butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in egg until blended (mixture will be dry).
  • Press firmly onto the bottom of prepared pan. Bake at 375° for 18-20 minutes or until edges are golden brown. Cool on a wire rack.
  • In a large heavy saucepan, bring the honey, brown sugar and salt to a boil over medium heat until sugar is smooth; stirring often. Boil without stirring for 2 minutes. Add butter and cream. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 1 minute or until smooth. Remove from the heat; stir in the hazelnuts, almonds, cashews and pistachios. Spread over crust.
  • Bake at 375° for 15-20 minutes or until topping is bubbly. Cool completely on a wire rack. Using foil, lift bars out of pan. Discard foil; cut into squares. Yield: about 3 dozen.

Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (1 each) equals 199 calories, 13 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 21 mg cholesterol, 157 mg sodium, 18 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 4 g protein.

Rustic Nut Bars published in Taste of Home December/January 2007, p28